Healing Points on your Body

Trigger points, a type of muscle stiffness, are the result of tiny contraction knots that develop in muscle and tissue when an area of the body is injured or overworked. Trigger points are something traditional doctors ignore, but they could be the one thing that has been overlooked in your case for years, if not decades.

A hallmark of trigger points is something called "referred" pain. This means that trigger points typically send their pain to some other place in the body, which is why conventional treatments for pain so often fail. Many health care practitioners wrongly assume that the problem is located where the pain is and therefore fail to assess the body correctly to find the cause of your pain.

I'm going to give you some valuable information about trigger points that I hope will encourage you to consider the possibility that trigger points may be the missing link in your quest for relief.

What Triggers a Trigger Point?

Trigger points can occur as a result of muscle trauma (from car accidents, falls, sports- and work-related injuries, etc.), muscle strain from repetitive movements at work or play, postural strain from standing or sitting improperly for long periods at the computer, emotional stress, anxiety, allergies, nutritional deficiencies, inflammation, and toxins in the environment. A single event can initiate a trigger point, and you can suffer the effects for the rest of your life if that trigger point is not addressed properly.

Why Trigger Points Cause Trouble

Your body's instinctive reaction to a harmful "event" is to protect itself. It does that by altering the way you move, sit, or stand, which puts abnormal stress on your muscles, tendons, ligaments, and joints. This produces strength and flexibility imbalances in your muscles, as well as postural dysfunctions throughout your body.

If that were not bad enough, your blood flow can become restricted and when that happens both your peripheral and central nervous systems will start to send out those "referred" pain signals, making assessment and treatment even trickier. That's why some experts believe that trigger points are the beginning stage of fibromyalgia. Can things get even worse? Keep reading.

Why You May Be Suffering

To better illustrate the process, here's an example of how one trigger point in one muscle can cause back pain, sciatica, or a herniated disc. The most common place for a trigger point is in the muscle of the lower back called the quadratus lumborum (QL), which is located just above your hips. Regardless of what kind of event sparks the trigger point, your QL will gradually become dysfunctional—that is, the QL will tighten and shorten. And as you limit its use, it will weaken.

As the QL becomes increasingly dysfunctional, it will alter the position of the pelvis. As the pelvis becomes dysfunctional, it will force the spine into an abnormal curvature that will put abnormal pressure on the disc. Over time, the disc will begin to bulge. This situation will get progressively worse, affecting your overall quality of life. Depression often follows. All of this from a single event that occurred in one moment in time.

Do You Have Trigger Points?

Everyone has trigger points; the question is degree. If you have lingering pain, tightness, or restriction of certain movements, it is a good bet that you are experiencing the effects of a trigger point. Trigger points may produce symptoms as diverse as dizziness, earaches, sinusitis, nausea, heartburn, false heart pain, heart arrhythmia, genital pain, and numbness in the hands and feet.

Trigger points can bring on headaches, neck and jaw pain, low back pain, sciatica, tennis elbow, and carpal tunnel syndrome—you name it. They are the source of joint pain in the shoulder, wrist, hip, knee, and ankle that is often mistaken for arthritis, tendonitis, bursitis, or ligament injury. If you think this is overkill, I suggest you read the book Why We Hurt: A Complete Physical & Spiritual Guide to Healing Your Chronic Pain, by Dr. Greg Fors, in which he explains precisely why so many different conditions are rooted in trigger points.

Here are a few more symptoms you should know about: If you have restless leg syndrome, you have TPs; if your teeth hurt, you have TPs; if your workouts have plateaued, you have TPs; if you have painful menses or irritable bowel syndrome, you have TPs.

17 comments:

Erika said...

Interesting stuff. I learnt a lot about healing points and eastern medicines back when I did kung fu.

+followed.

mac-and-me said...

awesome i will try if this helps me

Everyday Normal Guy said...

Very, very interesting.

Banquo said...

Interesting stuff +Follow :)

Anton Nuemus said...

wow.
didn't know that

imnotabot said...

Looks interesting! Wonder if it works!

PacoTaco said...

this is like acupuncture right?

Paul Johannsen said...

Haha.. that's pretty awesome. I'll be sure to try it out :)

Footy said...

wow,i didnt know that nice info bro
followed!

Steven said...

Like the blog. Great stuff

Stare Dad said...

thanks for sharing. this is great

Eric P said...

Very interesting, I've always been fascinated by this stuff.

Vexu said...

thanks for sharing :)

ERIK said...

I'm going to stab my foot and see what happens.

Blogasaurus Rex said...

I love lifehacks!!! Thanks for the upload, I intended my blog to become something like this.

Azurikai said...

really awesome stuff i might try a few of these!

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Internetttt said...

really informative sir! will try this out next time i get a headache lol

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